Tag Archives: “New York”

Vie Magazine

“Interconnect” by Amy Guidry; Vie Magazine; May 2018

My painting Interconnect is featured in the May 2018 issue of Vie Magazine.  It is part of their Introspections page and is a teaser to a larger article to be featured in their Animal issue coming out in August.  Look for Interconnect in the Couture issue out now.  And if you’re in New York, you can see Interconnect in person at Gristle Art Gallery now through May 5th.


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New Work / Exhibition

“Interconnect” by Amy Guidry; Acrylic on canvas; 6″ x 6″; $500; (c) Amy Guidry 2018

My latest painting in the In Our Veins series is now online.  This piece was created for Gristle Art Gallery’s “Floriography” exhibition going on now through May 5th, 2018.  It’s titled Interconnect and is an acrylic on canvas, 6″ wide by 6″ high.  The human third eye refers to our connection to all of nature, both flora and fauna.

I chose to paint a jaguar for this piece- one of my favorite big cats ever since childhood.  And an appropriate subject for a floriography-themed exhibit as their black spots are referred to as “rosettes” because of their rose-like shape.  Jaguars are mainly found in the Amazon or remote areas of Central and South America.  They haven’t reached full endangered status -yet- but their population is in decline and they are listed as Threatened.

“Floriography” is on view at Gristle Art Gallery in Brooklyn, New York now through May 5th.  You can also view the exhibit online here: https://www.gristleartgallery.com/floriography.html.


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Exhibition Opening

“Interconnect” by Amy Guidry; acrylic on canvas; 6″ x 6″; (c) Amy Guidry 2018

This is a sneak preview of sorts of my new painting Interconnect which will be part of Gristle Art Gallery’s “Floriography” exhibition.  It was selected as a promotional image for the show, so I’ll be posting the full image (sans text) once the exhibit opens.  If you are or will be in Brooklyn, New York anytime soon, the exhibition will be up March 10th through May 5th.  There will be an opening reception this Saturday, March 10th from 7-9pm.  More details here: https://www.gristleartgallery.com/current.html.


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In Progress / Upcoming Exhibit

Painting in progress (detail) by Amy Guidry; Acrylic on canvas; 6″ x 6″; (c) Amy Guidry 2018

In addition to my dodo bird painting, I’ve had another piece in the works for an upcoming exhibition.  This is a little sneak preview of my painting for the “Floriography” exhibition to be held at Gristle Art Gallery in New York.  The entire painting is 6″ wide by 6″ high and is an acrylic on canvas.  The exhibition will open March 10th.  I’ll give more details soon (sign up for my newsletter if you’d like to know when the finished piece is up: https://amyguidry.com/contact.html).


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Minetta Review

“The Wild West” by Amy Guidry on the cover of the Minetta Review

My painting, The Wild West, is on the cover of the latest issue of the Minetta Review.  The Fall/Winter issue just came out and a digital version is now online at: https://issuu.com/minetta/docs/f2016_minetta_mag_final_for_issuu.

In The Wild West, a skeletal horse and human hybrid, suggesting our practices of genetic manipulation, serves as a grim tale of foreboding.  The skeleton, the horse skull, and the desert are symbols of cowboys and typical Western imagery.  Television Westerns would typically portray life as good vs. bad, when in reality, the land, environment, people, and animals were all seen as a means to an end.  The title refers to how the U.S., itself a part of the western hemisphere, is still taking over land, animals, and resources to this day, creating desert landscapes via clear-cutting and global warming.


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Emerging to Established

“On the Rise” by Amy Guidry; acrylic on canvas; 10″w x 20″h; (c) Amy Guidry 2016

I will have work in the upcoming “Emerging to Established” group exhibition at Krause Gallery in New York, NY in January 2017.  The exhibit opens January 7th, 2017 with a reception from 6-8pm and will remain up through January 31st.


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There’s an ass involved in this exhibit. Spoiler alert: it’s not the donkey

Donkey exhibit image via Their Turn.net
Donkey exhibit image via Their Turn.net

The Frieze art fair in New York has a donkey on display as an “exhibit.”  The “artist” is Maurizio Cattelan.  The donkey is left standing around in an empty room with a chandelier above.  What?  This has no meaning, no message, nothing.  The artist thinks it connects humans to animals.  This couldn’t be further from the truth.  Instead, this donkey is on display, an object for our entertainment.  This is no different than going to a zoo, other than the pointless chandelier.

Many people are up in arms over the welfare of the donkey.  Of course the show promoters argue that the donkey has it “good” and much better than being in a barn.  Then again, are animals meant to just live out their lives in a barn?

This is not the first time animals have been used as “art.”  Last year there were a dozen horses cooped up in a gallery.  And in 2014, tortoises had i-Pads screwed into their shells for an “installation” piece by Cai Guo-Qiang.  These are just recent examples that have made headlines.  Unfortunately, there are others.  In every one of these cases, the artists and the gallery owners all argue that the animals are fine and unharmed.  There is no way that they can know this.  They just issue some sanitary, generic statement to put the public at ease and go about their day.  The animals are not their highest concern.

There is no reason why live animals should be used as art.  If you were to replace the animal with a child, you would get a call from Social Services, so how is it any different for any other living being?  There are ways to get your message across without using live animals.  You’re an artist, get creative and figure out another way.  I paint animals, I focus on our connection to the natural world, and I also deal with difficult issues such as habitat destruction and extinction, just to name a few.

If you really want to make a statement, how about going vegan?  How about not supporting companies that test on animals?  How about rescuing animals rather than using them?  That’s a far greater statement than this so-called art.

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Sold

"Circular" by Amy Guidry; Acrylic on canvas; 4" x 4"; SOLD; (c) Amy Guidry 2015
“Circular” by Amy Guidry; Acrylic on canvas; 4″ x 4″; SOLD; (c) Amy Guidry 2015
"Vision" by Amy Guidry; Acrylic on canvas; 4" x 4"; SOLD; (c) Amy Guidry 2015
“Vision” by Amy Guidry; Acrylic on canvas; 4″ x 4″; SOLD; (c) Amy Guidry 2015
"Conserve" by Amy Guidry; Acrylic on canvas; 6"w x 4"h; SOLD; (c) Amy Guidry 2015
“Conserve” by Amy Guidry; Acrylic on canvas; 6″w x 4″h; SOLD; (c) Amy Guidry 2015

A few of my small paintings in the In Our Veins series have recently found new homes in Louisiana and New York.  A couple of them were just featured in my newsletter upon finishing.  Circular and Vision are both acrylic on canvas, 4″ x 4″ and Conserve is also an acrylic on canvas, 6″ wide by 4″ high.

These are the remaining small paintings in this series available:

http://amyguidry.com/bind.html

http://amyguidry.com/change.html

http://amyguidry.com/entwined.html

http://amyguidry.com/spirit.html

http://amyguidry.com/resilient.html

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www.AmyGuidry.com

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Upcoming Shows

"Veil" by Amy Guidry; Acrylic on canvas; 6" x 6"; (c) Amy Guidry 2015
“Veil” by Amy Guidry; Acrylic on canvas; 6″ x 6″; (c) Amy Guidry 2015

I have two shows coming up- one in New York and one in New Orleans.  “(Ouroboros)” is a group exhibition opening at LeMieux Galleries in New Orleans, June 6th through July 25th.  The other exhibit is called “Reinventing the Helm” and will open at Sara Nightingale Gallery in the Hamptons, June 6th through August 3rd.

“(Ouroboros)” opens with a reception on June 6th, 6-9pm, in conjunction with the Julia Street Artwalk in New Orleans.  “Reinventing the Helm” opens June 6th as well, 6-8pm.

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Pay to Play

I’ve mentioned vanity galleries on here before but given some recent discussions, I felt it necessary to post about this controversial topic again.  I can tell you that I have never heard of anyone ever selling out a show or gaining ANY type of success from a vanity gallery.  Never.  If that were the case, we’d hear other artists singing their praises.  I know that it sounds great- a solo show in a major city (usually New York).  But that’s all you are getting.  A show.  There will never be a single show that will send your career into the stratosphere.  You’re thinking, right, of course not.  Well, if you’re willing to pay around $3000 plus all other costs associated with a show, then that show sure as hell better send your career into the stratosphere.  But again, that doesn’t happen.  So why even entertain the thought of showing in a vanity gallery?

OK- so here is the breakdown:

Vanity galleries are any gallery that require the artist to pay in order to show with them.  Not to be confused with a co-op gallery, which is owned and operated by the artists involved.

Vanity galleries charge an outrageous fee, this ranges anywhere from $1500- $3000 or just shy of selling a kidney.

Most vanity galleries also require that the artist install and de-install the show themselves.  Aside from this being a lot of work for the artist, after all, what are you paying the gallery for, but you’ll probably need a plane ticket as well if you don’t already live nearby.

Let’s not forget you are also responsible for shipping costs.  Plus you’ll be paying return shipping when the work does not sell.

You’ll most likely be responsible for invitation costs, so aside from printing costs, postage adds up quickly.

Vanity galleries do not push for sales.  Sure, the work is for sale, but nobody is going to work hard to sell it for you, they’ve already got your $3000, remember?

Many vanity galleries require that you do your own gallery-sitting anyway, so you’d be the only salesperson in that case.

You’ll also be responsible for drinks and food during the reception.

Lastly, and this is probably the worst of them all, your reputation is sullied in the eyes of “real” galleries.  Galleries know who the vanity galleries are and do not look kindly upon them.  If you think you’ll get a show with an established gallery with a vanity gallery on your resume, you are dead wrong.  Sorry to be so blunt, but I’m telling it like it is.  Galleries want to show artists that are successful based on their merits, not on how much they’re willing to pay their way to “success.”

And so, the big question here is “what are you paying for exactly???”  Just what does $3000 pay for?  Why does the gallery need that money?  I would love to hear their response.

If you’ve shown with a vanity gallery, the best thing you can do is to remove any mention of them from your resume, website, blog, social media sites, etc.  Make as if they don’t exist and move on.  Galleries that are new to your work don’t have to know.  Consider it a learning experience and just keep moving forward.  If you are still considering showing with a vanity gallery, the only other thing I can recommend is to Google them.  Look up their name with the word scam or just look up their name alone.  More than likely you will find horror stories and you can hear directly from artists that did participate.  Just keep in mind that no career was made overnight.  Even “superstars” that appear out of nowhere have been behind the scenes, working diligently for years and years, except no one was aware of that part.

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